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Improving Your Health Isn’t Magic, It Can Be Easy: Take Your Daily Walk At Bridal Trails State Park

Improving Your Health Isn’t Magic, It Can Be Easy: Take Your Daily Walk At Bridal Trails State Park

Bridle Trails State ParkWhat To Expect At Bridle Trails State Park

Bridle Trails State Park is a “wilderness area” in the middle of our city, it is a 482-acre day-use park that is is well-known for its horse trails and equestrian shows, and walking paths. The forested park is on the northeast edge of the Seattle metropolitan area.  We are so fortunate to share this thick forested area of douglas-fir, hemlock, and cedar, with pileated woodpeckers, mountain beaver, squirrels, chipmunks, rabbits, and coyotes.  Bridle Trails was the first park west of the Mississippi specifically designed, and still operated, for equestrian use.

Hiking Trails

The wide trails (23 miles of them) with little elevation are open to walkers and are probably best enjoyed during the off season and during the week.  It is easily available to east siders so it makes a wonderful place to walk as a break or during your lunch hour, or just after work.

Equestrian Trails

Park facilities that horse owners can enjoy include three arenas, picnic area, restrooms, and a huge parking lot. Bridle Trails is a day use only facility so riders here won’t be camping.  Riders will find over 23 miles of trails that wind and meander through 482 acres of thick forest dropped into the heart of Seattle’s eastside. The trails here offer a wide variety of experiences from wide, smooth to the more common single track and a very few spots where the trail is iffy.

Coyote, Raven, and Trillium are the three trails that will accommodate carts and they total about 6 miles. The remaining 17 miles of unnamed trails make up the majority of riding options here. While these trails may not be named they, in large part, are anything but secondary. The trail grooming at Bridle Trails is what might be expected from the surrounding upscale neighborhoods. When I rode here last a trail maintenance crew was using a leaf blower to clean the trail for an upcoming event. Yes, a leaf blower. ..

Park Hours

Summer: 6:30 a.m. to dusk

Winter: 8 a.m. to dusk

The park is open year-round for day use only.

You Will Need A Discover Pass

A Discover Pass is required for motor-vehicle access to state parks and recreation lands managed by the Washington State Parks and Recreation Commission, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife and the Washington State Department of Natural Resources.  Go to the Discover Pass online site for purchase information.

Annual Pass: $30

One-Day pass: $10

Directions To The Park

Bridle Trails State Park is located on the outskirts of Bellevue, Wash., a few miles northeast of Seattle, Wash. in King County.

Northbound: Take exit #17 off of I-405. At end of off-ramp, turn right and head south on 116th Ave. NE. At four-way stop, continue straight ahead. The park entrance is located at the first opening in the trees on the left.

Southbound: Take exit #17 off of I-405. At end of off-ramp, turn right and cross over freeway. At the first light, turn right again. Head south on 116th Ave. NE. At the four-way stop, continue straight ahead. The park entrance is located at the first opening in the trees on your left.

Park Map

Bridle Trails State Park

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3 Comments

  1. Enjoyed the horseback ride. This must be the America the first settlers saw. Do you have to worry about SNAKES?
    Linda Jones recently posted..Garden Tips – DayliliesMy Profile

    • I have done a lot of hiking on both the west and east sides of the Cascade mountain range and have seen one rattle snake in 10 years; it is pretty uncommon. You have a better chance of seeing deer, mountain goats, bald eagles, and butterfly’s. I have never come across a bear or a cougar; I tend to stay on more traveled and popular trails.

  2. Pingback: Seattle Trekker – If Not Now, When…A Path To Improving Health

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